Archive for April, 2008

Apr 30 2008

Sheepswool insulation

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roof-insulation.JPG Today our sheepswool came from the Black Mountain Insulation company in Wales. We are using 2 layers of 75mm thick sheeps wool insulation under the sedum roof to get a similar U value as 100mm of conventional insulation such as Celotex or Kingspan.

Apr 19 2008

Wet weekend idea for sedum roof

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roof-sedum-close-up.JPGIt rains again this weekend which is ideal for helping the sedum settle in. Just like the irrigation system, when the sedum has not had any water for a while it is hours before any rain makes it’s way to the guttering. Once it does you get a slow trickly which makes it the ideal roofing cover for our low lying ground to avoid flooding. This will work particularly well with summer storms during dry periods as the sedum will soak up and store most of the water in it’s fleece carpet.

Apr 16 2008

Sedum Roof Safety System

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roof-saftey-restraint-bar.JPGThe sedum roof will need annual “maintenance” to check that all plants are healthy and to remove any weed growth that might compete with the sedum. So to comply with the safe working at hieght directives we have fitted a guide to limit the movement of a safety line when people walk on the roof to do this work. This top rail can be fitted now the sedum in place. The sedum should grow to a height of 75-100mm so this will eventually be more concealed.

Apr 15 2008

Fertilizing and watering in the sedum roof blanket

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roof-lee-lying-on-the-sedum.JPGSo by 4pm after an 11am start the 185 square metres of sedum roof is covered and trimmed. Now fertilizer is sprinkled by hand over the roof and the whole roof sprayed with a sprinkler head for an hour or more to avoid the fertilizer burning the sedum. Because of this the initial watering cannot be done using the leaky pipe system but subesquent waterings can. And overnight we get some rain which is a real bonus!

Apr 15 2008

Trimming the Sedum

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roof-cutting-off-excess-sedum-at-edge.JPGWhere the sedum roll comes to the edge of the roof it is cut to length with the diamond disc cutter. You can use a stanley knife but you use a blade in a single cut because the fleece is very abrasive.

Apr 15 2008

Laying the Sedum Roof

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roof-crane-frame-used-to-unroll-sedum.JPGThe crane lifts the rolls up to the roof and the usual crane sign language is used to lower them in to place and unroll it up the slope.

roof-rubbing-an-overlap-edge-with-wood-block.JPGTo overlap each 1 metre wide roll an overlap edge has been provided that generally needs rubbing with a block of wood to remove odd bits of sedum and create a straight line for the next roll to butt up to.

Apr 15 2008

Sedum blanket roll

Comments Off on Sedum blanket roll

roof-sedum-roll-end-view.JPG End view of the sedum, which is grown on a fleece “carpet”. It is cut the day before and must be laid out today or it will die. Better get a move on then!

Apr 15 2008

Sedum to the house

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roof-sedum-rolls-on-artic-fork-lift.JPG Like most houses our site does not have enough space for an artic so the fork lift that lives on the back of the artic trailer has to bring the 22 rolls of sedum to the house for the crane to lift them up.

Apr 15 2008

Our Sedum Roof arrives

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roof-sedum-and-crane-frame-arrive.JPG We find the lorry a little lost in the village and lead him to site. Our sedum is in rolls on the artic trailer, in between rolls of turf for other customers. The blue thing on top is the frame to hang from the crane to roll out the sedum which is in rolls of about 300kg.

Apr 15 2008

Sedum Roof Ridge detail

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roof-sedum-ridge-blanket.JPGOn the ridge of the roof a special fleece is laid to help hold moisture in this area prior to the sedum being laid on top.